Cupid and Psyche - Wikipedia - mythology eros and psyche

Category

mythology eros and psyche - The myth of Psyche and Eros


Psyche – the gorgeous maiden. Psyche was a woman gifted with extreme beauty and grace, one of the mortal women whose love and sacrifice for her beloved God Eros earned her immortality.. Psyche became, as Greek word “psyche” implies, the deity of soul. To modern days, the myth of Psyche symbolizes a self-search and personal growth through learning, losing, and saving the real love. The myth of Eros and Psyche is probably one of the best love stories in classical mythology. Eros, son of Aphrodite, was the personification of intense love desire and he was depicted throwing arrows to people in order to hit their heart and make them fall in love. Psyche, a beautiful maiden.

Eros gathered her into his arms and flew them back to his palace. It took a while, but Eros finally convinced his mother, Aphrodite, to accept Psyche as his wife. With Aphrodite's help, he convinced the great Zeus to admit Psyche to the ranks of the immortal gods. In celebration, Psyche and Eros threw a party at the palace. Apollo played his lyre. Psyche was one of three sisters, princesses in a Grecian kingdom. All three were beautiful, but Psyche was the most beautiful. Aphrodite, the goddess of love and beauty, heard about Psyche and her sisters and was jealous of all the attention people paid to Psyche. So she summoned her son, Eros, and told him to put a spell on Psyche.

Eros – known as Cupid to the Romans – was the Greek god of sexual attraction, a constant companion of Aphrodite.Variously depicted as either a beautiful youth or a mischievous nude boy, Eros is most commonly represented with a bow and an unlimited number of arrows which he uses to overpower the reason and incite erotic feelings in any mortal or god per Aphrodite’s or his own wish.Author: Greekmythology.Com. The tale of Cupid and Psyche (or "Eros and Psyche") is placed at the midpoint of Apuleius's novel, and occupies about a fifth of its total length. The novel itself is a first-person narrative by the protagonist Lucius. Transformed into a donkey by magic gone wrong, Lucius undergoes various trials and adventures, and finally regains human form by eating roses sacred to Isis.