Adult Hydrocephalus - prognosis for adult hydrocephalus

Category

prognosis for adult hydrocephalus - Hydrocephalus - Symptoms and causes - Mayo Clinic


Hydrocephalus can occur at any age, but is most common in infants and adults age 60 and older. It affects adult males and females, as well as people of different races, about equally. Experts believe that normal-pressure hydrocephalus accounts for five to six percent of all dementia cases. The hydrocephalus prognosis for patients is difficult to predict, although there is some correlation between the specific cause of the hydrocephalus and the patient's outcome. Prognosis is further complicated by the presence of other problems, the timeliness of diagnosis, and the success of treatment. The degree to which decompression -- relief of cerebrospinal (CSF) pressure or buildup Author: Arthur Schoenstadt, MD.

The prognosis for individuals diagnosed with hydrocephalus is difficult to predict, although there is some correlation between the specific cause of hydrocephalus and the outcome. Prognosis is further complicated by the presence of associated disorders, the timeliness of diagnosis. Hydrocephalus in adults. There are two other forms of hydrocephalus which do not fit exactly into the categories mentioned above and primarily affect adults: hydrocephalus ex-vacuo and normal pressure hydrocephalus. Hydrocephalus ex-vacuo occurs when stroke or traumatic injury cause damage to the brain. In these cases, brain tissue may actually.

Hydrocephalus is a condition that occurs when fluid builds up in the skull and causes the brain to swell. The name means “water on the brain.” Brain damage can occur as a result of the fluid Author: Amanda Delgado And Valencia Higuera. Symptoms of Hydrocephalus. The symptoms of untreated hydrocephalus vary. During pregnancy, routine ultrasound can detect enlarged ventricles or spaces within a baby’s brain. In an infant, the most obvious sign of hydrocephalus is an abnormal enlargement of the baby’s head.

Aug 13, 2019 · Symptoms of hydrocephalus vary with age, disease progression, and individual differences in tolerance to the condition. For example, an infant's ability to compensate for increased CSF pressure and enlargement of the ventricles differs from an adult's.